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Meditation workshop at Church

The second seminar at the First United Methodist Church of East Greenbush was set up by Patricia Chartrand, the mom of one of my long standing clients. Attended by 14 women as part of a periodic women’s group retreat. Three of the women attended my first seminar in March 2015. It was so nice on their part to share their experiences on how it helped them and family members. 

Summary of the Feedback

I will use this technique for my …

  • Improve my sleeping
  • Sleep, Pain
  • Insomnia, COPD attacks, Breathing
  • Getting better sleep
  • High blood pressure, Pain
  • Blood pressure
  • Grieving process, Regaining my normalcy and daily function (after the recent death of my husband)
  • Anxiety- children

My take home points…

  • Counting and breathing
  • Like the counting much
  • Counted breathing
  • Breathing one-two-three
  • Use this technique
  • To keep breathing
  • Making meditation a priority, Doing it during any moment of the day.

My evaluation of the seminar…

  • Very satisfied – 9
  • Satisfied – 5


  • I have tried this here today. It calmed me down.
  • Looking for more info. on this once I have the basics.
  • I am reminded to reclaim these teachings for my “Now” reality as a new widow.
  • Wish it was longer.
  • Thank you.
  • Great ideas. Very helpful ideas.
  • I have attended several meditation groups and found each one very good and lasting in long duration (when disciplined to do it).
  • Only drawback was inability understanding due to your accent.
  • Thanks for coming after a long night of travelling.

I recommend this seminar to (name the group)…

  • Youth group at First United Methodist Church.
  • Schodack senior center
  • Complementary Care Officer (Sharon Wheeler) at Albany Medical Center (who organizes stress reduction classes for AMCH employees.)
  • I will recommend this to others.

(1) First United Methodist Church of East Greenbush

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+ Calmed my Mom having Alzheimer’s

Report by Zina (not her real name) about how the ‘Tip mode’ calmed her 84 year old mom suffering from Alzheimer’s (1) (2). This is the first report of this kind (4). 

“I have just started using your ‘focusing on breathing’ relaxation technique very recently myself. But one day, I decided to do it together with my mother who is 84 years old, suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. She lives alone in an apartment in the Bronx.

I call her every day, just to stay ‘hello’ or ‘how are you’. Sometimes I get her at her worst when she is at her very agitated ‘sundown’ state.

One day, I decided to guide her through ‘tip mode’ of counting breaths technique over the phone. We did it together for just about five minutes and that calmed her down very much.

Later on, she even asked me to write the instructions down for her in our native language and mail it to her because she would not be able to remember how to count breaths by herself. Great technique! Thank you very much.”

(1) Zina is a patient of my daughter Padma Sripada MD (3). When Zina came to see her last time for her headaches, Padma suggested she may try ‘focusing on breathing’. Apparently Zina felt the practice may prove helpful to her Mom, could guide her on phone and saw a surprising result.
(2) Tip Mode
(3) Padma Sripada MD
(4) Scanned image of her e-mail

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+ Feedback from Elementary School Children

I conducted 3 after school classes on ‘Focusing on breathing’ at Robert C. Parker School for 2 boys and 1 girl  in March/April 2014 (1) (2). The way the classes were done is explained at (3).The feedback form the children and parents is presented below.

Parent’s feedback
  • “I think breathing practice is beneficial for my daughter  in managing her impulses. She seems to enjoy the breathing practice in your class. When I prompt her to practice, though, she sometimes insists that she does not want or need to do it.  I am working on coaxing her to do the breathing practice with me. I would like to make it a regular practice for both of us. I think it would be good to do in the mornings and evenings, and then hopefully the practice will help her managing through the day as well”. My response to this mom is at (4).
  • “My son tends to do his breathing while he’s trying to fall asleep. I’ve observed him utilizing it over the past week, during an anxiety provoking situation.   The mode he tends to use is deep breathing while counting in his head.”
 Children’s feedback 

What times did they practice?: Most common were bedtime and morning. But some practiced at breakfast and evening also.

What modes did they practice?: Collectively – Folding mode, Tip mode, Segment mode and Counting mode.

Why did they practice?: Each of them gave different reasons.

  • Felt tired in the morning, practiced and felt awake
  • I got up before my mom and she didn’t wake me up as she was doing before
  • When I got home from school,  I was mad and I did the breathing.
  • Middle of the day – helped me not watch TV
  • When I had a headache I did the breathing and my headache go away.
  • When I was mad with my friend

How did the breathing help?

  • Helped me get to sleep, wake up and eat breakfast
  • When my dog got crazy, I did the breathing and my dog calmed down! (watching me doing the breathing)
  • Helped me go to sleep
  • It calmed me down when I was mad
  • When I was hyper, I would do the breathing and it calms me down

I like the breathing because

  • It is fun and relaxing
  • It is good for me. My mom wants me to teach her. I will teach her when I learn all.

(1) How Can I Focus On Breathing?
(2) Robert C. Parker School
(3) How were the classes done?: In the first class, they were shown and practiced the ‘Folding mode’, ‘Tip mode’ and ‘Counting mode’. In the second class, we reviewed the previous modes and they were shown’ ‘Staring mode’ and ‘911’ mode’. In the third class, they were suggested how they could use the techniques at bedtime, on waking up and any other times they needed. In every class, they filled out a feedback form with the questions (a) When did I practice? (b) What mode did I practice? (c) Why did I practice? (d) How did the breathing help?
(4) My response to the girl’s mom: (a) It is better for her long term success not to coax her. Let the practice grow organically over some months, so that it becomes a part of her coping skills to help her all her life. (b) Our role is to encourage her own practice without making her feel like she is doing a chore. She is basically right that she would practice when she needed it. The exceptional situations where we should proactively suggest to practice are at bedtime which most children love to do anyway, when we see them upset, hyperactive, angry etc. (c) When she is in a good mood and you feel it is the right time, you can try practicing along with her, allowing her to practice her favorite mode and you can practice your own choice mode.

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