Standing still

Stand straight with your feet shoulder width apart. Keep the inner sides of the feet parallel. Don’t lock the knees, let them flex a tiny bit. Keep your hands straight, away from the body by about 6 inches with the palms facing the legs. Raise your shoulders a tiny bit to loosen them. Keep your head up, looking ahead. Close your eyes. Whenever you feel out of balance and afraid you will topple, open your eyes momentarily, regain balance and close them again. Practice the any of the finger modes or the ‘counting mode’ (1).

Focus the mind on the constantly changing body sensations and the slight movements at the knees, hips, shoulders and neck. Feel the pressure of the feet on the floor and the continuous shifting of the pressure points. Try to make the pressure of the soles on the floor, same all over, from front to back and right to left. Do this as good as you can without stressing yourself.

Practice this posture in the morning or evening for about 5 minutes or till you experience some flexibility in the joints of your body. Practice on weekends, for 10 – 20- 30  minutes without a break, to see the remarkable impact of this practice. If you stand for a long time in this posture, you may even sweat!

Alternative Method for people with better balance

Stand with the big toes touching and the heels about an inch apart. Place both palms and fingers touching each other. Place them on your chest with the wrists resting on your chest, as in the Asian Indian ‘Namaste’ posture (2). Feel the expansion and contraction of the belly, as the breath goes in and out. All other directions remain same as above.

Benefits

Improves awareness of body sensations and movements. When practiced for about 15 minutes, it makes a rigid body remarkably flexible. It develops the ability to be still, preparing for successful meditation. It arrests wandering of mind and calms the mind and body.

(1) How can I focus on breathing?
(2) Namaste posture Picture

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Parent page: ‘Phase II – Physicals’

Next page: ‘Sitting on the floor, shoulders supported by hands’ 

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