Stretching and Moving

The physical practices presented here can play a crucial role for the current generation whose busy electronic life style leads to unhealthy postures with the muscles from the eyes to soles, held frozen for hours. One of my clients even told me that she did not drink water at work because she would have to go to the rest room!

In these practices, you gently stretch all the muscles, using still postures and movements, on the bed and off the bed, maintaining unbroken focus on breathing. More at (2).

These postures and movements should be practiced before a meal or about 2 hours after a meal. Their purpose is to become aware of body movements and sensations while retaining the focus on breathing. They are also to train the body to be still for quite some time, preparing it for sitting meditation for an extended period, at the next level III. Each of these practices is described in detail, along with the suggested time of practice and its benefits.

Still Postures

Standing still: In this practice you stand still and focus on the sensations and small movements at various places in your body, from soles to top of the head. More…

Sit on the floor, palms on the floor: You introduce gentle stretch into the legs, shoulders and hands and become conscious of it.  More….

Child Pose: This stretches the back significantly. It has great healing power. If your back is rigid or waist girth is high, try the less demanding versions. More….

Movements – YOGA based

Sit Ups: This is vigorous aerobic movement with full focus on breathing. Start with a few repetitions if your knees hurt too much. Gradually increase the number. More…

Rolling: This requires some practice. Skip it if your body is heavy. More…

Gentle loosening stretches of Yoga: This is a wonderful set of stretches for all parts of the body, done in the standing position. More…

Sitting on a chair for ‘heavier bodies’: This is a chair based version of Sun Salutations of Yoga for heavier bodies. Pictures with text. More…

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Parent page: Complementary practices